MEET

In

SPAIN

Meetings and Events Magazine

Ed. 18 - Málaga

Tourist Office of Spain

Why Málaga?

Organizing your Event

Special Venues in Málaga

Leisure activities for your event in Málaga province

Plan your trip to Málaga

Agenda

Ed.18 Málaga - July 2016\n

Introduction

We invite you to discover the luminosity and color of Málaga,\n

a city whose warm climate, unique culture and delicious gastronomy make it one of the highest quality tourist destinations in Europe. The capital of the Costa del Sol is ideal for the incentives and meetings industry, boasting four conference centers and 25 convention spaces as well as modern infrastructure, a variety of luxury hotels and an unbeatable range of golf courses. Málaga also has spectacular natural coastal areas and green zones as well as a unique culture, in which over three thousand years of history converge.
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Why Málaga?

01

Organizing your Event

02

Special Venues in Málaga

03

Leisure activities for your event in Málaga province

04

Plan your trip to Spain

05

Agenda

06

Handicrafts Highlights

Spain is a tempting shopping destination with its world-renowned chains, stunning local fashion, long sale seasons and a great variety of vintage and avant-garde products. Spain is at the forefront of global shopping destinations, and the United States is the second biggest international spender. The excellent quality, exclusive brands and variety of luxury products are all important factors, as is the generous VAT return, which at 15.7% is the highest in Europe. In addition to luxury fashion shops and world-recognized brands, Spain has a rich tradition of artisanal craftwork which is present throughout the country. Here is a sample:\n

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Galicia: Sargadelos ceramics

Galicia is known as the final stop of the Way of Saint James, the famous pilgrimage route. But there are many more reasons to visit this green corner of Spain. Sargadelos are unique ceramics from this region, dating back to the start of the last century. Infused with English influences, Sargadelos see rich Galician clays transformed into innovative crockery.
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Cantabria: Wood-carved clogs

These clogs or “albarcas” are rustic wooden shoes, historically worn by rural peasants across Cantabria. Perfect for protecting the feet from water and dirt while out working the fields, these days they are still the ideal shoe for the humid climate of northern Spain. Albarcas are similar to the clogs found in other Spanish regions or to the Dutch sabot, but, since they are carved by hand, they have their own unique characteristics.
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Pais Vasco: Bellows

The industrialization of the Basque Country over the last century has led to the decline of many traditional crafts, including iron and woodworking. However, the market for leather handicrafts is booming, especially the production of wineskins and bellows, traditionally used for stoking fires.\n

Barcelona: Pottery from Miravel

On the banks of the River Ebro, Miravet is famous for its stunning scenery, rich culture and history, and its pottery. The tradition of ceramics can be traced back to Moorish times, many centuries ago, and the region was recognized as an Arts and Crafts Area of Interest by the Catalan government in 2000. In Miravet village, you can visit seven pottery workshops and buy beautiful bowls, jugs, pots and jars.
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Royal Crystal from La Granja

The Royal Glass Factory of La Granja was created as part of a push by the Bourbon crown to reduce imports of foreign luxury goods through the promotion and protection of national industries. This historic building continues to serve as a craft workshop for the production of glass, while also hosting other cultural and scientific activities.
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Photo: gufm via Foter.com / CC BY-NC\n

Salamanca: Filigrana Charra

Nothing represents the treasures of Salamanca quite like the filigrana charra, pieces of silver jewelry with both Jewish and Arab influences. Local artisans craft exquisite pieces to decorate traditional costumes, the best known of which is the charro button.

Photo: Jsome1 via Interior Design / CC BY\n

Madrid: Handmade fans

The fan is one of the most famous folklore products of Spain, found in classic cinema, literature, fiestas, and in flamenco. In Madrid, countless workshops are still devoted to making fans in a wide variety of colors and materials. Known throughout the world for their craftsmanship, these fans are not merely used for keeping cool in the long Spanish summer but are also true miniature works of art.
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Toledo: Damasquinada

The steel of Toledo has long been the stuff of legend. In particular, this Medieval city is famed for its artisanal crafts and, above all, its swords and its damascene craftworks. Originally brought to Spain from Damascus, damascene craftsmen perfected the art of decorating steel with intricate threads of silver and gold. Several workshops in the historic city still preserve the traditional process, with shops selling damascene handicrafts. 
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Photo: Renata Sedmakova / Shutterstock.com\n

Valencia: Manises ceramics

For centuries, the town of Manises has been synonymous with ceramics.  Indeed, the history of the ceramics industry and the history of the town itself have been interwoven since the fourteenth century, and continue to be so to this day. Local specialties include exquisite painted tiles and patterned plates.
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Mallorca: Espadrilles

In the Raiguer region, famed for its leather and footwear handicrafts, you can find some of the oldest shoemaker studios in Mallorca. The combination of excellent materials and the unique production process mean espadrilles from Mallorca consistently enjoy success at some of the most prestigious international craft fairs worldwide.
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Sevilla: Ceramics and tiles

Seville is characterized by its handcrafted pottery and ceramics. The first works are dated from the Neolithic age, although it was during the Muslim Period that they started to acquire their own unique personality. Most workshops are located in the historic Triana neighborhood, where you can wander the streets and see examples of craftsmanship in walls, tiled floors and roofs. Later, artisans adopted eastern techniques and mixed this with local traditions, evident in mosaics and hand-painted tiles.
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Córdoba: Leather

In the historic city center of Cordoba you can see ceramics, Caliphate silverware, textile prints, jewelry and, of course, leather goods. Leather is the raw material used in making the famous Cordobanes and Guadamecies, which are pieces of leather embossed, modelled and coloured with modern or classical designs. Nowadays only a few family-run workshops keep this traditional handicraft alive.
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Granada: Handmade guitars

Spain was the birthplace of the modern six-string guitar, though it was based upon a similar  stringed instrument of the Islamic world. The guitar is the versatile accompaniment of choice in the art of flamenco, and Granada is Spain's capital for the production of the instrument. Here, guitars continue to be handmade by skilled craftsmen and are renowned for their fine quality and precious woods.
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Albacete: Knives and Penknives

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, artisan knifes flourished in the region of Albacete. Originally, the knives were produced by Moorish craftsmen, with the techniques and traditions they employed still maintained today. A special knife museum in Albacete city celebrates the past and future of this local speciality.
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Tenerife: Handmade Lace

The 'Calado Canario' has been kept alive for generations, with knowledge of this art traditionally passed from mother to daughter. This is one of the most delicate and complex of handicrafts, with artisans working with materials such as linen and cotton, and creating patterns and intricate drawings on fabrics of all sizes.
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01 WHY MáLAGA?\n

Why Málaga?\n

• Open, modern, and business-oriented character.
• Unique mixture of cultural heritage and modern infrastructure.
• Sub-tropical Mediterranean climate, granting visitors more than 325 sunny days a year.
• Safe, clean and welcoming community.
• Great variety of leisure services that make every event a success.\n

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Perfect location

2

Málaga to antiquity

3

A renewed city

Málaga is located in the south of Spain, surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea. As a major force in the Andalusian economy, the capital of Costa del Sol has become the fifth most populated city in Spain. Moreover, its privileged natural setting between the sea and the surrounding mountains offers one of the mildest climates in Europe.\n

The Phoenicians, the Greeks, the Carthaginians, and the Romans have all left their mark on the city of Málaga. Over 2,000 years ago, the strategic port became a crucial link in trade routes and commercial exchanges. The Alcazaba (8-11th century), one of the symbols of the city, is among the largest Arab fortresses in Andalusia. Today, this building hosts the Archaeological Museum, which contains valuable artifacts dating from Phoenician and Roman times.\n

In recent years, Málaga has undergone a remarkable evolution as a European tourist destination. An increase in hotel capacity, new museums and cultural attractions, an increasingly recognized culinary scene, the creation of modern facilities for conferences and meetings, and an ambitious pedestrian plan in the historical center are just some of the reasons why Málaga has doubled its tourism numbers.
 
The strength of the city lies in four key segments: cruise tourism, conference tourism, meetings and incentives, idiomatic tourism and cultural tourism.

Photo: Kushch Dmitry / Shutterstock.com\n

Organizing your Event

02 ORGANIZING YOUR EVENT

Convention Bureau

Málaga Convention Bureau

The main objective of the Málaga Convention Bureau (MCB) is to promote the city as a venue for conferences, conventions and incentive travel. This institution offers travel advice and listings of excellent hotels and service providers to companies in order to help them put on unforgettable events.

Photo: © Área de Turismo. Ayuntamiento de Málaga\n

Special Event Venues

Congress Centre of Málaga

The Trade Fairs and Congress Centre of Málaga is a strategic location for trade fairs, conferences and other events. The strategic space helps guests forge trade and cooperation ties in the heart of the economic engine of Andalusia.
The centre opened in 2003 with:
- 17,000 m² of exhibition space
- 2 exhibition halls
- 2 auditoriums, holding 600 and 900 people respectively
- 2 conference rooms for 400 people each
- 12 spacious meeting rooms
- A large restaurant that can accommodate up to 1,500 people.

Photo: © Área de Turismo. Ayuntamiento de Málaga\n

Hacienda del Alamo

For very special events, Málaga offers the Hacienda Del Alamo, a manor house of the nineteenth century surrounded by 26,000 m² of gardens. It is equipped with dining rooms for both intimate and larger celebrations, and an outdoor space that holds about 600 people, surrounded by a green zone with mature trees, a bamboo forest, a greenhouse, fountains, Arab pools and a natural waterfall that lends an exceptional atmosphere to all events.\n

Automobile Museum

This museum houses the private collection of Portuguese car aficionado Joao Magalhaes. The collection, worth around 25 million euros, is among the most important vintage car collections in the world. Located in the emblematic La Tabacalera building, the spacious museum is open for events ranging from private celebrations to business meetings and conferences. Over 6,000 m² of space can accommodate up to 5,000 people.

Photo: Museo Automovilístico y de la Moda.\n

La Casilla de Maera

Gerard Brenan and Ernest Hemingway were once friends with the owner of this Cortijo, Don Angel de la Riva Resines, and often visited him here. Located between Málaga and Torremolinos, it has a botanical garden with room for over 1000 people, a heated tent of 1000m2, and ample parking. La Casilla de Maera offers its spaces and facilities to celebrate events of all sorts, working with catering firms of Certified Quality issued by the Junta of Andalucia.\n

Hotels

Hotel Miramar (5 * Great Luxury)

With nearly 100 years of history, this building was a hospital during the Spanish Civil War, then a hotel, and later a courthouse. Built in the Art Nouveau style with spectacular sea views, the Hotel Miramar reopens this year with 200 rooms and luxury facilities (heated indoor pool, spa, sauna, massage rooms, and more), a 700-person event capacity and extraordinary gastronomic offerings.\n

Vincci Posada del Patio (5 *)

Vincci Posada del Patio, in the historic centre of Málaga, offers a unique space with five-star service. You can dine in the gourmet restaurant, cool off in the rooftop pool with views over the city, and relax and work in fine suites, function rooms and more.\n

AC Málaga Palacio

This hotel on the Costa del Sol is ideal for business trips as well as leisure trips. Featuring views of the city’s port, AC Málaga Palacio is near the Picasso museum, the Alcazaba, Castillo de Gibralfaro Castle, and La Malagueta beach. The hotel is 2 km from the railway station and just a ten-minute drive to the airport.

Photo: LordFerguson via Foter.com / CC BY-SA\n

NH Hotels

Right in the center of Málaga, this modern building can accommodate any type of event up to 1,000 attendees. The hotel also rents out its indoor and outdoor terraces for private events and helps organize any type of catering, from coffee breaks and cocktail events to formal dinners.\n

03 Special Venues in Málaga

Special Venues in Málaga

Trying to combine the comforts of a beach vacation with a deep cultural experience? That’s easy to do in Málaga! With more than thirty museums, the majority of them concentrated in the old district, it has truly become a world-class museum city.\n

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Picasso Museum

Carmen Thyssen Museum

Centre Pompidou

Collection of Saint Petersburg

The Alcazaba

Technology Park of Andalusia

Picasso Museum

The opening of this museum fulfilled Picasso’s personal wish: that his work should be represented in the city where he was born. Located in the Palace of the Counts of Buenavista, the museum houses more than 200 works from the artist’s private collection and is considered to be the second most important of its kind, after only the Picasso museum in Paris.
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Photo: klublu / Shutterstock.com\n

Carmen Thyssen Museum

More than 300 Spanish and Andalusian paintings – mostly from the 19th century – can be viewed in the XVI-century Villalon Palace of Málaga. The exposition opens with a series of Old Masters including Zurbaran’s depiction of Saint Marina, and continues through a section dedicated to romantic landscapes and local customs.
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Centre Pompidou

Málaga was specially chosen to host the first Pompidou Museum outside of France. The museum, located in a multicolor cube on the banks of the harbor, offers an artistic tour of the XX and XXI centuries through almost 90 carefully selected works from the incomparable Centre Pompidou collection.
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Photo: Juan Aunion / Shutterstock.com\n

Collection of Saint Petersburg

This collection from the State Russian Museum of St. Petersburg exhibits the rich Russian artistic legacy of the past centuries, from icons inspired by the Byzantine tradition to the socialist realism during the Soviet epoch. Visitors will see works by world-famous artists such as Kandinsky, Tatlin, Rodchenko and Chagall.
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Photo: Anna Pakutina / Shutterstock.com\n

The Alcazaba

This Moorish fortress, renovated in 2003, is both an urban structure and an archaeological site. According to Arab historians, it was built in the 11th century and contains columns, capitals and other materials taken from the nearby Roman Theatre. It combines a defensive purpose (from its location you can overlook the city and bay) with the characteristic beauty of an Arab palace and is organized around rectangular courtyards, patios, gardens and pools. This architectural gem showcases the fusion of light and shades that the Arab master builders achieved so well.
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Technology Park of Andalusia

One of the pillars of economic development in Málaga is the Andalusia Technology Park, which has recently celebrated its twentieth anniversary. At the time of its creation, the city had low business development and a marked lack of innovation and technology. However, the development of the Technology Park heralded the revitalization of the city and its significant development in terms of infrastructure and services. The park and the city work together to manage transportation projects, the redevelopment of urban areas, and the training of entrepreneurs, among others. The park is complemented by its proximity to leisure areas, such as restaurants and bars, social services, sport areas and many residential buildings.
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Photo: montuno via Hollywoodthing / CC BY-SA\n

Picasso Museum

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Carmen Thyssen Museum

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Centre Pompidou

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Collection of Saint Petersburg the Russian Museum

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The Alcazaba

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Technology Park of Andalusia

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Leisure activities for your event in Málaga province

04 INCENTIVES

Málaga Tapas Tour

Climbing

Bike Tour

Route of the Andalusí Legacy

Málaga Tapas Tour

In this half-day activity, food-lovers have the opportunity to discover the traditional products and dishes of Málaga, including marinated olives, artisanal wine, handmade creams, fried fish and more. It’s impossible to be hungry after this excursion, which includes a selection of 6 tapas, 3 tastings, drinks, coffee and a special gift.\n

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Climbing

This entertaining activity for all levels can be performed in a rockodrome or at outdoor climbing zones. The company provides the necessary materials to safely participate.\n

Bike Tour

This mountain tour traverses three thousand years of civilization, the tropical gardens of El Parque and the beachfront promenade. Taking to the streets gives visitors an excellent opportunity to interact with the welcoming locals.\n

Route of the Andalusí Legacy

Málaga is the starting point of the Andalusí Legacy. The Alcazaba fortress is a major point on a 7-day circuit that comprises several cities in southern Spain. Participants will stay in Paradors, monumental buildings that have been selected for their historical, artistic or cultural interest and refurbished as delightful hotels.

Photo: Parador de Carmona, Paradores de Turismo\n

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05 Transportation

Plan your trip to

Málaga

Flights

Trains

Roads & Port

Flights

Pablo Ruiz Picasso Airport

Málaga’s airport is the fourth largest in Spain (after Madrid, Barcelona and Palma de Mallorca) in terms of both air traffic and number of passengers. It is just 8 kilometers (5 miles) from the city and offers excellent connections to the Costa del Sol at Torremolinos, Fuengirola, Marbella, Puerto Banus, and other stops. The growing influx of tourists from around the world has prompted the airport to add a third terminal, which enjoys direct links with UK. But do not worry about getting lost: all areas are interconnected and easily accessible.

Photo: Leo Hidalgo (@yompyz) via Foter.com / CC BY\n

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Trains

The railway network connects Málaga with Andalusia as well as the rest of Spain. From the Maria Zambrano Station downtown, high-speed Renfe trains run frequently to Madrid, Seville and other Spanish cities. A new station in the airport's third terminal offers frequent connections to the main station, adding a new link in the convenient network.

Madrid has flight connections with many U.S. cities. From the Spanish capital, you can take a high-speed train to Málaga in just 2h30’. New York is also connected with Málaga Airport via direct summer flights.\n

Roads & Port

If you like the road, the bus is an ideal way to navigate the Málaga area, the rest of Andalusia and even connect with other destinations in Spain and North Africa. The main Bus Station is conveniently located in the city center so you can enjoy the main venues of the city a short walk away.

Like all Mediterranean cities, Málaga has always been linked to the sea and the riches that come from it. Sheltered by a natural bay, the Port of Málaga has become the peninsula’s second most important cruise port.\n

Port

Like all Mediterranean cities, Málaga has always been linked to the sea and the riches that come from it. Sheltered by a natural bay, the Port of Málaga has become the peninsula’s second most important cruise port.

Photo: © Área de Turismo. Ayuntamiento de Málaga\n

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Agenda

What’s happening in Spain this summer

06 AGENDA

Popular Fiestas, Music, Art, Sports.\n

Popular Fiestas

Music

Art

Sports

Popular Fiestas

Málaga Fair

August 13 – 20, 2016. Málaga.
The summer festivities of Málaga are rooted in the commemoration of the incorporation of Málaga to the Crown of Castile by the Catholic Monarchs, who entered the city in August 1487. The city hosts a variety of events and activities for all ages: the famous bullfights, fireworks, concerts, competitions, and more.
Photo: klublu / Shutterstock.com\n

Popular Fiestas

Bonfires of San Juan

June 20 – 24, 2016. Alicante
Each year, Alicante celebrates the arrival of summer with the bonfires of San Juan. During these days, the people burn enormous cardboard and wooden monuments and celebrate this great homage to fire. The last night, the “alicantinos” cook a traditional dinner, dance around bonfires, set off fireworks and go swimming in the sea.\n

Popular Fiestas

Fire Festivals for the Summer Solstice in the Pyrenees

June 20 – 29, 2016. Aragon and Catalonia
As part of an ancient ancestral tradition in different parts of Aragon and Catalonia, people celebrate the summer arrival with a variety of rituals centered on fire. UNESCO has declared these festivals to be an intangible cultural heritage, and they take place during the ephemeral and mystic midsummer solstice.\n

Popular Fiestas

The Battle of Wine

June 28 – 30, 2016. La Rioja
Every summer in the town of Haro in La Rioja, thousands of locals (and a handful of tourists) swarm the cliffs of Riscos de Bilibio for an enormous battle, bearing a most unusual weapon – wine. The streets flow with grape juice and the participants are dyed completely purple. Afterwards, everyone returns to the town for a festive lunch with all the typical products of the region – including, of course, the local wine.
Photo: Nebunel1 via Remodel Blog / CC BY\n

Popular Fiestas

Moors and Christians Fiesta

July 24 – 31, 2016. Valencia
The Moors and Christians festivals of Villajoyosa were declared to be of National Tourist Interest in 2003. These festivals are a great tourist attraction for all those interested in knowledge of Arabic and Christian culture: the celebration commemorates the Reconquest of Spain. For a full week of festivities, you can enjoy majestic parades by the opposing ‘armies’, gastronomic competitions, dances, fireworks and concerts at night. In the early hours of the 28th, the Moorish vessels land and the symbolic battle begins, with spectacular shows all day.\n

Popular Fiestas

San Fermín Fiestas

July 6 – 15, 2016. Navarre
The favorite attraction of Ernest Hemingway, the Running of the Bulls attracts thousands of people every year to experience the risk and excitement of the San Fermín fiestas. For this one week a year, the normally tranquil town of Pamplona gets overrun by a festive spirit that invades every street, resident and visitor.
In addition to the bulls, each morning features a parade of “giants and big-heads” to delight the little ones. The festive program also includes concerts, dance exhibitions, and open-air celebrations.
Photo: Migel / Shutterstock.com\n

Popular Fiestas

La Tomatina

August 31, 2016. Valencia
One of the world’s great food-fights, this unusual fiesta brings together crowds of people ready to experience the fun of throwing tomatoes at anything that moves. The Tomatina starts in the town square of Buñol, with pastries provided for breakfast by the city. At 11 o’clock, a shot announces the start of the fight and trucks loaded with tomatoes arrive one after another. When everything turns red, it is time to go to the river and try to get clean before the traditional lunch.
Photo: Ayuntamiento Buñol\n

Music

Cante de las Minas Festival

August 3 – 13, 2016. Murcia
La Unión, located in the southern region of Murcia, celebrates the world’s greatest annual flamenco festival: Cante de las Minas. Renowned flamenco masters and young artists alike converge at this musical event. Visitors can also enjoy exhibitions, projections, poetry recitals, classes, and more.
Photo: Fundación Cante de las Mina / Autor José Rafael Hernández\n

Music

International Festival of the Celtic World

July 14 – 17, 2016. A Coruña
This summer festival is a world-famous folk music gathering and one of the most massively attended musical events in all of Spain. It is a free, open-air festival in Ortigueira focusing on Celtic sounds and other music styles. In 2005, this event was declared to be a festival of International Touristic Interest.
Photo: charroworld via Foter.com / CC BY\n

Music

BBF – Barcelona Beach Festival

July 16, 2016. Barcelona
This year will be the third annual BBF Festival, an exceptional series of concerts on the beach of Barcelona. Just 20 Minutes from the city center, the festival has in previous years hosted artists such as Nicky Romero and David Guetta.
Photo: Christian Bertrand / Shutterstock.com\n

Music

FIB – Benicàssim International Festival

July 14 – 17, 2016. Castelló
Throughout its history, the Benicàssim International Festival has been a focal point for alternative pop/rock and electronic music lovers in Spain. The event also welcomes other forms of creative expression such as dance, theatre, sculpture and short film.
Photo: Christian Bertrand / Shutterstock.com\n

Art

Cervantes at The Royal Palace

April 23 – December 30, 2016. Madrid
Celebrating the 4th centenary of the death of Miguel de Cervantes, the capital of Spain hosts at The Royal Palace an exhibition of the writer’s original works, as well as tapestries depicting Don Quixote and examples of armour from the period.\n

Art

Andy Warhol, Shadows at Guggenheim Museum

February 26 – October 2, 2016. Bilbao
At age 50, Warhol embarked upon the production of a monumental body of work entitled Shadows. These 102 handmade canvases explore abstraction by attracting visitors’ perception.\n

Art

Eye Games, Collection at Picasso Museum

March 14 – September 11, 2016. Málaga
Throughout his life, Picasso experimented with a variety of different artistic styles and techniques. For the first time, Málaga’s Museum is embracing all of them from a distinct angle: the viewer’s gaze.
Photo: © Museo Picasso Málaga\n

Sports

Sailing: King’s Cup Regata

July 30 – August 6, 2016. Majorca (Balearic Islands)
The King’s Cup is the most important of all Spanish sailing competitions. Bathed in the warm blue Mediterranean, the event has taken on a real festive atmosphere which attracts even non-sailors with live music, local food and drinks.\n

Sports

Cycling: Tour of Spain

August 20 – September 11, 2016.
One of the three “Grand Tours” of European cycling (together with the Tour de France and the Giro D’Italia), the Tour of Spain has an 80-year history that survived even the Spanish Civil War. The race consists of 21 stages stretched out over three weeks. The itinerary is sometimes extended to France, Andorra, Portugal, Holland or Belgium.
Photo: David M G / Shutterstock.com\n

Sports

Motorcycling: Jerez Circuit

January 1, 2015 – December 31, 2017. Jerez
The city of Jerez has a long tradition of excellence in motorsports. In the 60’s, the prestigious international race called “Trofeo de la Merced” was first organized, with motorbike legends like Angel Nieto, Ricardo Tormo and Marco Luchinelli participating. By the 80’s, the Circuito de Jerez had become one of Europe’s most important tracks, hosting the Formula One, Sport Prototypes and Motorcycles World Championships.
Photo: Rainer Herhaus / Shutterstock.com\n

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